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Wok Giveaway!

THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO ENTERED! THIS CONTEST IS NOW CLOSED. A WINNER WILL BE ANNOUNCE MONDAY, APRIL 30TH.

 

I am so excited to announce our very first Wok Wednesday Giveaway!

Thanks to Tane Chan, owner of San Francisco’s The Wok Shop, one lucky Wokker will win a brand-new 14″ flat-bottomed carbon-steel wok!

Here’s how to enter:

  • Leave a comment on this post telling us your biggest wok or stir-fry related question. Not sure how to season your wok? Don’t know where to find ingredients? Let us know and you could win!
  • Comments must be left by 11:59pm EST on Saturday, April 28th. One winner will be picked at random and announced on Monday, April 30th, along with our next giveaway!

As we lead up to our start date we’ll have exciting giveaways each week, so be sure to check back every Monday!

Many thanks to Tane Chan of The Wok Shop for donating the wok and covering the shipping costs!

– Matt

The Wok Shop owner Tane Chan

About The Wok Shop:

Located in the heart of San Francisco’s famous Chinatown, The Wok Shop is a family–owned and operated business specializing in hard–to–find Asian cooking tools. Our unique stock of merchandise covers nearly every aspect of Asian cooking!

For over 35 years, we have enjoyed an excellent reputation for having a knowledgeable and friendly staff prepared to answer the toughest of customer inquiries.

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57 responses »

  1. I’d love to know the best way to clean a wok. I’ve heard mixed suggestions, and don’t know how much effort it’ll take to take care of it!

    Reply
    • I use Grace’s technique for a “wok facial” and it has worked wonders! Here’s a video on how it’s done:

      Reply
    • You should wash a carbon-steel wok as you would a cast-iron skillet. Just hot water and scrub any sticky food debris with the rough side of a Scotchbrite sponge. You can also wash it with a little dish soap but it’s not necessary. After rinsing place the wok on low heat for 1 to 2 mins until the pan is dry. Never dry it with paper towels or a kitchen towel.

      Reply
  2. Once I get the right wok – hopefully through this giveaway 🙂 – I’ll need to season it. If I can’t find Chinese chives in my grocery store, what should I use as an alternative to absorb the metallic flavor?

    Reply
  3. Is there a such thing as getting a wok too hot? I never seem to get a good sear onmeat when stirfrying.

    Reply
    • Yes, you can overheat the wok. I test the wok’s heat by throwing a drop of water in the wok. Once the water evaporates within a second or two it’s ready. Depending on the power of the stove this can take 1 to 3 minutes.
      If you were to heat the wok for 10 minutes obviously the water drop would evaporate within a second or two but it would be too hot. The moment you added the oil, the oil would start to smoke wildly. This is NOT good, as it means you’ve destroyed the oil and the ingredients will char upon being added to the wok. So be sure that you don’t over heat the wok.

      Reply
  4. Why, even my oil is smoking, does food seem to steam rather than fry?

    Reply
    • Is your food dry from moisture. Meats should be patted dry.

      Reply
    • First of all your oil shouldn’t smoke. See the above answer. There can be a little smoking but it shouldn’t be wild. If your food ends up steaming there can be several reasons. The most common reason is adding too much food or wet ingredients (like vegetables haven’t been towel dried).

      Reply
  5. Currently, I don’t have a wok. It’s on the ever expanding list of must-have kitchen gadgets. I’ve always wondered how to properly season and clean a wok for when I do get one. Do you simply wipe it clean with at towel? Crossing my fingers that I can finally cross ‘wok’ off my list! 🙂

    Reply
    • Seasoning requires more than just wiping it clean with a towel. It’s too much for me to write the entire recipe for you here. The recipe is in the book but I think Matt will also post a video on this site in the next weeks. But roughly, you have to scrub the inside and outside of the wok with liquid dish soap using a stainless-steel scrubber and hot water. Do that several times and then rinse with hot water. Then the wok needs to be dried over heat until all the water in the pan has evaporated. Finally you need to stir-fry Chinese chives or a mixture of scallions and ginger in the wok for about 20 minutes. It’s very simple but there are more details to the recipe than I’m writing here so do check out the recipe in the book.

      Reply
  6. My biggest question is How can I ensure I win this wok ? 🙂 Okay actually my question is .. is there one particular way to store a wok (given limited space) that is better than another?

    Reply
    • If you use the wok often as I do leave it on top of the stove. Some people store it in the oven. I don’t like hanging a wok because it attracts lint and dust. If you’re not using the wok often store it in a large paper shopping bag and put it in a cabinet or closet. If you live in a humid area the paper prevents the pan from exposure to the moisture and therefore rusting.

      Reply
      • Okay so its almost like caring for a cast iron pan. No room on my stove. Already have a kettle and one pot.

      • I would store it in a kitchen cabinet or pantry. If you don’t use it often keep it in a paper shopping bag to protect it from moisture and dust.

  7. Honestly, I’d just like to know where to start. It’s only in the past 2 years that I’ve started cooking anything more than the garbage that college guys make regularly (spaghetti, boxed meals, frozen pizza, etc.). After obtaining a wok, what’s the next thing a wok owner should actually do? That is, what meals should he/she try? How best should he/she ease into things?

    Reply
  8. Pingback: Wok Giveaway for Wok Wednesdays | Green Eats Blog

  9. If I hit an intruder with a wok, will it do more damage than the traditional frying pan to the face?

    Reply
  10. I’d like to know why my food always seems to stick in the middle of the wok? Am I cooking too long? I guess that’s two questions…

    Reply
  11. How long will a typical wok last? What is the price range for a good one?

    Reply
  12. What IS the best way to season a wok?

    Reply
  13. I just got a wok and seasoned it. After I am done cooking, I read that I should rinse it out, put it back on the stove and let it dry on low heat. After that, do I wipe some oil on it? Or just leave it alone?

    Reply
  14. Will a stainless steel wok ever have that seasoned look? If not I hope to get a carbon steel one. I am so craving that seasoned black look – weird huh? Good luck to everyone!! 🙂

    Reply
  15. Can the home cook with an electric stove get close to the same results as the restaurant?

    Reply
    • The home cook will never have the same range power as a restaurant chef. However, if you make certain adjustments i.e. preheating the wok, not overfilling the wok with too much food, drying your vegetables, I believe your stir-fries will taste better than a restaurant’s. The reason is the home cook can use high quality ingredients like vegetables from the farmer’s market, naturally raised beef or chicken, or wild salmon. A Chinese restaurant can never afford to use organic ingredients or shop at a farmer’s market. Using fresh, quality ingredients is the key to a great stir-fry. It’s not just about the heat.

      Reply
  16. Okay, I know this is kinda cheating, but how great is it that the wonderful Tane Chan is doing this to help the lucky winner (me, me, me!) get started wokking the right way. We got to visit the Wok Shop on our visit to San Francisco. I highly recommend it to anyone in the area.

    Reply
  17. Tane Chan is wonderful. For those of you who haven’t been to The Wok Shop, it’s the mecca for woks. There is no one in the world who understands woks like Tane—she’s been selling them for over 30 years. There is no one who has a better sense of humor about woks—ask her to tell you about couples who fight over wok custody when they divorce. And there is no one more generous about sharing wok knowledge and being the first to donate a wok for Wok Wednesdays!

    Reply
  18. For years I have been trying to figure out how to achieve Wok Hay as you describe in one of your previous books but I cannot seem to get there. I go to a restaurant that makes Lard Naa with what I consider the most extraordinary gravy that seems to overflow with Wok Hay. When I am home and make a Chow fun or another dish I just don’t seem to have the flavor that I so crave from Asian based restaurants. Can you please help me my giving me any words of advice Grace?
    signed a loyal fan for many years.

    Reply
  19. I have a wok that I bought last year & can’t remember if I seasoned it properly or not. Can I redo it using your method?

    Reply
  20. Grace, Looking forward to seeing you again when you take the “Texas Tour!” Just wanted to say that I really enjoyed cooking side by side with you last year! And for those who really want an informative resource on stir frying with some awesome recipes, I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND purchasing Grace’s cookbook, “Stir Frying to The Sky’s Edge” It got the 2011 James Beard Best International Cookbook Award, and the way Grace explains everything, it is SO easy and FUN!
    Keep Cooking!
    Chef Lee Ewing

    Reply
  21. How big of a wok do I need to cook enough food to feed a family of 6? Or is wokking all about cooking in batches?

    Reply
  22. Since my current wok is nonstick, I am in the market for a new one. Hoping to win the wok, but being realistic. If I have a gas stovetop, should I buy a flat bottomed wok or a round bottomed one with a ring? Which is best?

    Reply
  23. How do I clean my wok?

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  24. Is there a proper order to add food to the wok?

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  25. I have been experimenting with desserts in my old worn out, greatly needing replacing wok….: Can I put the wok in an oven to finish cooking? or do I need to transfer the ingredients onto a baking sheet? question two, have you ever used a wok on a bbq ? is it possible to get it to the high heat necessary over charcoal/wood mix?

    Reply
    • It depends on what kind of wok you have. If it has wood handles you’ll have to wrap the handles with a wet facecloth. Then wrap the handles again with aluminum foil. This prevents the wood from burning. When handling the wok be sure to use pot holders–also use pot holders for metal handles. If the wok has plastic handles you cannot do this.

      I have used a wok on a bbq. If the bbq has power you’ll be able to stir-fry but the “average” grill doesn’t generate enough heat. You’ll have to experiment.

      Reply
  26. Whats the best way to stir fry fresh fish so it doesn’t break apart?

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  27. Is there a wok store you recommend in NYC!

    Reply
    • I like KK Discount (78 Mulberry bêtw canal and bayard in Chinatown. There’s also Hung Chong a restaurant supply store. I think it’s 14 bowery. Be careful with both shops that you don’t buy the nonstick wok.

      Reply
  28. How long will a good wok last?

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  29. First off, I’m dying to get a wok. Stir frying meals in my pathetic small pans just isn’t cutting it. My question is, does putting a wok in a dish washer ruin the material/flavor of the foods you cook in it. What is the best way to clean a wok? Sponge and dishwashing soap? Or does it matter on the wok-type? Thanks! Fingers are crossed.

    Reply
  30. I am super excited about this group! Can’t wait to get my book and wok and start stir-frying! What is the best oil to use for cooking?

    Reply
  31. How does the difference in temperature inside the wok (i.e. between the bottom and the side) contribute to the special taste of food cooked in it?

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  32. What do you think about using coarse salt to clean your wok?

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  33. would love to have a wok again, but how do I keep it from rusting if I don’t use it every day/week?

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  34. i got my 1st wok from ur shop at my bridal shower in the 80’s wow! i need a new one flat bottom is cool!! asperagus, beef, mushrooms and black bean sauce is hubby fav

    Reply
  35. I just borrowed my mother’s wok, purchased when she took community ed. cooking classes from Leeann Chin in the 1970s. It got decades of use. We were the only house on our suburban MN block having Sunday dinners of stir-fried beef and peapods, sweet and sour chicken, fried wontons (we kids’ favorite) and shrimp toasts. Anyway, I’m not sure what the wok is made of. It has a round bottom and two metal handles, and hasn’t rusted after many years of disuse. It has a lovely patina. I don’t want to destroy it by cleaning it improperly. Is there any way to determine what it’s made of? Also, my gas stove burners sit in depressions in the enamel. The wok ring doesn’t fit in the depressions, but can sit on the burner grate. Will this be close enough to the heat? (My mother used the wok/ring on an electric range back then with great results.)

    Reply
  36. I love to use a wok but I really am not sure I know how to season or clean.

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  37. I have been using a 16 inch non-stick Wok and it just doesn’t cook it right. All my vegetables seem to get soggy from the surrey that I use to steam. Am I supposed to keep Wok covered the entire time to cook vegetables? Because if I don’t cover, the carrots and broccoli are too hard. Please advise me.

    Reply
  38. Do people have a favorite outdoor, propane heating setup? Particularly the “wok attachment” or something that has a bunch of wide flames and a good perch for the wok? How many BTUs are enough? 68,000 BTUs should do the trick? I should be at the wok shop this weekend, may as well claim my prize while I’m there. 😉

    Reply
    • The Easton outdoors 18″ wok and burner set is great. About 70,000 btu. They also have a big kahuna burner that is very portable. They both can be used for wok or pots. Or cheaper is an 8,000 to 10,000 btu butane portable burner. 1 8 oz can of fuel is about 3 hrs of cooking. And it will heat the wok just as well as a home gas range at 7,000 to 10,000 btu on average.

      Reply
  39. After marinating the meat there is always liquid in the bottom of the bowl. Should I pat the meat dry before adding it to the wok? How?

    Reply
  40. How much oil should I use when stir frying a single portion? Thanks!

    Reply

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